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FCC raids a micro (pirate) radio station in Santa Cruz…

By M. Sean Gilligan | "M. Sean Gilligan" <seanlist@...> | M_Sean_Gilligan
September 29, 2004 | Post #1321 | Topic #1321

... and I was there with a DV camera with a dead battery. So, I shot a little video and a handful of camera-phone photos. The posts are here: http://msgilligan.blogspot.com/2004/09/john-malkin-on-fcc-raid.html http://msgilligan.blogspot.com/2004/09/slide-show-of-fcc-raid-on-free-radio.html This is my (lame) attempt at doing Steve Garfield-style citizen journalism. I literally just happened to be driving by. What was going on touches on many of my favorite subjects: * Alternative vs. Mainstream Media * Free Speech * Government Regulation of Communication Don't have anything intelligent to say, just a little A/V. Cheers, Sean -- --------------------------------------------------------------------------- M. Sean Gilligan : 831-466-9788 x11 Catalla Systems, Inc. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- [View]



Re: [videoblogging] FCC raids a micro (pirate) radio station in Santa Cruz…

By Shannon Noble | Shannon Noble <sn@...> | sh7nnon
September 30, 2004 | Post #1322 | Topic #1321

--B_3179341227_95813 Content-type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable That=B9s very good Sean!!!!! What was this all about? Did Al Gore have an= ything to do with it? Jest. .s On 9/29/04 8:18 PM, "M. Sean Gilligan" <se= anlist@...> wrote: > ... and I was there with a DV camera with = a dead battery. So, I shot a little > video and a handful of camera-phone = photos. The posts are here: > http://msgilligan.blogspot.com/2004/09/john-= malkin-on-fcc-raid.html > http://msgilligan.blogspot.com/2004/09/slide-show= -of-fcc-raid-on-free-radio.ht > ml > > This is my (lame) attempt at doing = Steve Garfield-style citizen journalism. I > literally just happened to be= driving by. What was going on touches on many > of my favorite subjects: = > > * Alternative vs. Mainstream Media > * Free Speech > * Government Regu= lation of Communication > > Don't have anything intelligent to say, just a= little A/V. > > Cheers, > > Sean --This is Vlog: http://x.nnon.tv/ --B_3179341227_95813 Content-type: text/html; charset="ISO-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: [videoblogging] FCC raids a micro (pirate) radio s= tation in Santa Cruz...</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE=3D"Verdana">That&= #8217;s very good Sean!!!!!<BR> <BR> What was this all about?<BR> <BR> Did = Al Gore have anything to do with it? Jest.<BR> <BR> .s<BR> <BR> On 9/29/04 = 8:18 PM, "M. Sean Gilligan" <seanlist@...> wrote= :<BR> <BR> </FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE=3D"New York"><TT>... and I was the= re with a DV camera with a dead battery.  So, I shot a little video an= d... [View]



Re: [videoblogging] FCC raids a micro (pirate) radio station in Santa Cruz…

By M. Sean Gilligan | "M. Sean Gilligan" <seanlist@...> | M_Sean_Gilligan
September 30, 2004 | Post #1323 | Topic #1321

At 10:20 PM -0700 9/29/04, Shannon Noble wrote: >What was this all about? Free Radio Santa Cruz (http://www.freakradio.org) has been broadcasting illegally for about 10 years. I don't know what the ups and downs of their ongoing battles with the FCC have been, but today the FCC did what only the government can legally do: sent in people with guns to achieve their objectives. Personally, I have mixed feelings about the situation. Being not very subversive myself, I think people should try to obey the law, even when it is stupid. Then you try to change it. 10 years is a pretty long run, after all. Most of the people that were in the crowd viewed it (solely) as a free speech issue, but if everyone could just set up a transmitter and start broadcasting, and there were no restrictions regulations, what would stop some Clear Channel classic rock station from blowing them off the airwaves? I don't know the details of the technology and law for FM broadcasting, but I think the reasonable solution would be to change the law (or regulations) to allow micro-broadcasting under reasonable conditions. In this specific case, I don't think that FRSC (aka "Freak Radio") was hurting anyone (i.e. interfering with another signal.) The FCC took their antenna, transmitter, computers, tape players, turntables, and I heard they were taking records, tapes, and CD's too. That's the stuff they're loading into the "undercover" camper-shell pickups... [View]



Re: [videoblogging] FCC raids a micro (pirate) radio station in Santa Cruz…

By akb@demandmedia.net | akb@... | akbakb2000
September 30, 2004 | Post #1331 | Topic #1321

> Most of the people that were in the crowd viewed it (solely) as a free > speech issue, but if everyone could just set up a transmitter and > start broadcasting, and there were no restrictions regulations, what > would stop some Clear Channel classic rock station from blowing them > off the airwaves? To characterize the position of low power radio advocates like this is wrong and dangerously so, as it is often used by the broadcast industry to scare people into opposing licensing low power broadcasters. If a community station has been running a station for 10 years, why on earth would they want to interfere with anyone, especially a full power station that is 1000 times as powerful? No one would be able to hear them. There are of course some people that have the extreme position of no regulation on philosophical grounds, but there are people that take extreme positions on any issue. > I don't know the details of the technology and law for FM > broadcasting, but I think the reasonable solution would be to change > the law (or regulations) to allow micro-broadcasting under reasonable > conditions. There has been a movement doing this for nearly 2 decades. Some have chosen civil disobiedience (like Free Radio Santa Cruz), some have chosen to take on one of the most powerful lobby's in DC. I think they work together pretty well. Laws protecting civil... [View]



Re: [videoblogging] FCC raids a micro (pirate) radio station in Santa Cruz…

By Andreas Haugstrup | "Andreas Haugstrup" <videoblog@...> | andreashaugstrup
September 30, 2004 | Post #1332 | Topic #1321

It's interesting for me to hear how things are in the US. Here radio broadcasting is very different. Commercial radio is a relatively new thing. It is only in the last couple of years that we've gotten national commercial radio. I don't know if anyone bothers to listen to them since we have four national public service station (P1 through 4). There's P1 which is talk radio, P2 with mostly classical, P3 the pop/rock and P4 with local segments. I think that the no national commercial radio is due to the small market, which again is heavily due to the fact that there is P3 for pop/rock that has much better radio than any commercial station. They have the best hosts, and no commercials. The whole thing is funded through viewer licenses, compulsory if you own a radio or a tv. All four radio channels and the two tv stations DR 1 and 2 are funded this way - plus government funding of course. It's funded by the state, but not controlled by them. Anyway, local radio. As far as I know it's not particulary hard to get a local radio license (national licenses are impossible to get). In my city (pop. just over 180,000) there are 8 local indenpendent stations and 2 local commercial stations. The independent stations all share the same frequency. Probably because none of them are able to broadcast more than they do (okay, the university... [View]



Re: [videoblogging] FCC raids a micro (pirate) radio station in Santa Cruz…

By M. Sean Gilligan | "M. Sean Gilligan" <seanlist@...> | M_Sean_Gilligan
September 30, 2004 | Post #1334 | Topic #1321

Hi Alan, Thanks for providing all the information. As I said, I'm not really knowledgeable on the issue, so thanks for educating me. Can anyone out there do a better case for the FCC than I did? > >> Most of the people that were in the crowd viewed it (solely) as a >free > speech issue, but if everyone could just set up a transmitter and > > start broadcasting, and there were no restrictions regulations, what > > would stop some Clear Channel classic rock station from blowing them > > off the airwaves? > >To characterize the position of low power radio advocates like this is >wrong and dangerously so, I wasn't trying to characterize the position of low power radio advocates, but of the FCC. I'm trying to see both sides of the issue and that was the best I could do for the FCC. >If a >community station has been running a station for 10 years, why on earth >would they want to interfere with anyone, especially a full power >station that is 1000 times as powerful? No one would be able to hear >them. I did say that I'm pretty sure they're not interfering with anyone. > > > One interesting thing about FRSC is that they call themselves a > > "collective" and as I was hanging around asking questions, it truly > > seemed like no one was "in charge". According the... [View]



Re: [videoblogging] FCC raids a micro (pirate) radio station in Santa Cruz…

By Jay dedman | Jay dedman <jay.dedman@...> | kinshasa2000
September 30, 2004 | Post #1333 | Topic #1321

> I've heard the term "people's media" applied to blogging. I think i >cannot achieve that if the "people" represented through it do not >match the larger demographics of society. Thus community >media activists recognize the need to actively train people to be >able to participat and seek to include those that economics and >education exclude. Its interesting to hear how radio work in Denmark. its amazing what you can do when you have a small, fairly homogenous, and enlightened population. it is important understand that in the US, these media corporations are using public TV/radio airwaves for profit. a lot of profit. (cable and satellite tv is different) the original rules speak of allowing these corporations the use of these public airwaves as long as they serve the community. over time, any debate over what is "the public good' has ceased. NBC/ABC/CBS and Clear Channel Radio run their operations as if they own these airwaves. becasue their lobbyists are so powerful, our representatives continue to deregulate these public properties, as well as loosening the rules of conglomeration. Clear Channel Radio now owns the majoirty of radio stations in the country, playing media that is very very simlilar and has little to do with the region in which its airing. see, Im in a funny position. Growing up in the US in the 80's in punk music, I dont wont to be an activist. I want to not care. I... [View]



Re: [videoblogging] FCC raids a micro (pirate) radio station in Santa Cruz…

By M. Sean Gilligan | "M. Sean Gilligan" <seanlist@...> | M_Sean_Gilligan
September 30, 2004 | Post #1335 | Topic #1321

> Following another study that confirmed >the FCC's originally findings, there is a bill in Congress to allow >groups like Free Radio Santa Cruz to become licensed. Do you have info on this bill? -- Sean -- --------------------------------------------------------------------------- M. Sean Gilligan : 831-466-9788 x11 Catalla Systems, Inc. : http://www.vblogcentral.com --------------------------------------------------------------------------- [View]