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Topic #19610

When the video camera makes the reputation…

By chrbaudry | "chrbaudry" <chrbaudry@...> | chrbaudry
August 11, 2005 | Post #19610 | Topic #19610

Something unexpected - and fun? - happened to me yesterday. I have been shooting yoga and dance classes for a yoga/wellness studio these last 4 days. Each time it is a short interview of the teacher and when editing I insert shots from the class. It is then integrated into their blog. The first three days I was using my PANASONIC DVC60 which is a shoulder semi-professional video camera that looks pretty much like a pro camera. Each time I got a lot of respect from everyone there and they would do what I wanted in terms of sound, light... Yesterday I brought my Canon Elura video camera which is a small hand camera just fine to shoot video that will be streamed Guess what? No one cared about me! Teachers had other priorities, I was basically ignored and wasted one hour! Great lesson about credibility! Christian Baudry [View]



Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By James A. Donnelly | "James A. Donnelly" <videotv@...> | jadly6
August 11, 2005 | Post #19613 | Topic #19610

I Guess it's all in the gurth of your camera! jad --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, "chrbaudry" <chrbaudry@g...> wrote: > Something unexpected - and fun? - happened to me yesterday. > > I have been shooting yoga and dance classes for a yoga/wellness > studio these last 4 days. Each time it is a short interview of the > teacher and when editing I insert shots from the class. It is then > integrated into their blog. > > The first three days I was using my PANASONIC DVC60 which is a > shoulder semi-professional video camera that looks pretty much like > a pro camera. Each time I got a lot of respect from everyone there > and they would do what I wanted in terms of sound, light... > > Yesterday I brought my Canon Elura video camera which is a small > hand camera just fine to shoot video that will be streamed > > Guess what? No one cared about me! Teachers had other priorities, I > was basically ignored and wasted one hour! > > Great lesson about credibility! > > Christian Baudry [View]



Re: [videoblogging] Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Chris Baudry | Chris Baudry <chrbaudry@...> | chrbaudry
August 11, 2005 | Post #19616 | Topic #19610

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Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Jack Nelson | "Jack Nelson" <jack@...> | mexiculture
August 11, 2005 | Post #19632 | Topic #19610

--- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, "chrbaudry" <chrbaudry@g...> wrote: > Something unexpected - and fun? - happened to me yesterday. > > I have been shooting yoga and dance classes for a yoga/wellness > studio these last 4 days. Each time it is a short interview of the > teacher and when editing I insert shots from the class. It is then > integrated into their blog. > > The first three days I was using my PANASONIC DVC60 which is a > shoulder semi-professional video camera that looks pretty much like > a pro camera. Each time I got a lot of respect from everyone there > and they would do what I wanted in terms of sound, light... > > Yesterday I brought my Canon Elura video camera which is a small > hand camera just fine to shoot video that will be streamed > > Guess what? No one cared about me! Teachers had other priorities, I > was basically ignored and wasted one hour! Yeah, having a big pro-like camera can work against you in certain situations too. It's pretty easy to get footage on the subway for instance if you have a small non-pro looking camera. But whip out that big shoulder DVC60 and you'll be asked pretty soon where your permit is. Jack [View]



Re: [videoblogging] Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Pete Prodoehl | Pete Prodoehl <raster@...> | raster
August 11, 2005 | Post #19636 | Topic #19610

Jack Nelson wrote: > --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, "chrbaudry" <chrbaudry@g...> wrote: >>Yesterday I brought my Canon Elura video camera which is a small >>hand camera just fine to shoot video that will be streamed >> >>Guess what? No one cared about me! Teachers had other priorities, I >>was basically ignored and wasted one hour! > > Yeah, having a big pro-like camera can work against you in certain situations too. It's > pretty easy to get footage on the subway for instance if you have a small non-pro looking > camera. But whip out that big shoulder DVC60 and you'll be asked pretty soon where your > permit is. Permit for what? Do you need a permit to shoot video on the subway or other locations? (I'm asking because I really don't know. Are the videographers rights the same as the well known photographers rights?) Pete -- http://tinkernet.org/ videoblog for the future... [View]



Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By davedraws | "davedraws" <davedraws@...> | davedraws
August 11, 2005 | Post #19640 | Topic #19610

You know, I've noticed the same thing, even the difference between the Canon GL2 and my small handheld Canon still camera with video capability. I try to use it to my advantage the other way as well. When I want the footage I get to be more spontaneous, with less pressure on the subject, I'll take along the smaller camera. Great candid footage that way. And then the larger camera brings in more attention to getting a more formal shot. Great observation! Dave --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, "chrbaudry" <chrbaudry@g...> wrote: > Yesterday I brought my Canon Elura video camera which is a small > hand camera just fine to shoot video that will be streamed > > Guess what? No one cared about me! Teachers had other priorities, I > was basically ignored and wasted one hour! > > Great lesson about credibility! [View]



Re: [videoblogging] Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Frank Carver | Frank Carver <frank@...> | frankefficacy
August 11, 2005 | Post #19652 | Topic #19610

Thursday, August 11, 2005, 7:55:12 PM, Pete Prodoehl wrote: > Permit for what? Do you need a permit to shoot video on the subway or > other locations? (I'm asking because I really don't know. Are the > videographers rights the same as the well known photographers rights?) What you need to remember is that traditionally TV and moviemaking has meant big budgets. Many big cities in the USA (where lots of such things are shot), long ago decided to cash in on these lucrative activities. In such places (which (AFAIK) include LA, NY, and Chicago, for example) you need to pay up front for a permit to shoot, and will be nabbed if spotted doing something that looks like pro filmmaking without a permit. In these cases, looking like a dumb tourist is actually an advantage :) On the other hand, many small towns and the more out-of-the way places are often happy for the publicity, and you might even get support if you approach the right people in the right way. -- Frank Carver http://www.makevideo.org.uk [View]



Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Steve Watkins | "Steve Watkins" <steve@...> | elbowsofdeath
August 11, 2005 | Post #19657 | Topic #19610

And there is the War On Terror aspect. In the past this list has seen a few discussions about Subway station 'you arent allowed to film here' legislation and the reality on the ground. I guess that one was New York specific, cant remember details. But the basics are that if you are videoing places that could be of interest as terrorist targets, well you could be a terrorist doing reconnacence on the target. And I believe they can even abstract that idea further, eg 'you are not a terrorist but if you make your footage publically available, a terrorist could use it to plan naughty deeds'. This sort of thing is probably not routinely taken to that extreme yet, but this is the sort of stuff that can also potentially impinge on your rights to film in this day and age. And yeah this stuff too is touched by the 'size of camera' issue. If you are being indiscreet with a big camera and filming something somebody doesnt want you to, then theres umpteen ways to try to get you to move on I guess, the war on terror adds one powerful new one. But with cameras built into mobile phones, and shrunken cameras, the whole game changes. Still I suppose there are some circumsntances where youd actually look more suspicious filming something with a tiny/non apparent videocamera, compared to a larger one? Steve of Elbows --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com,... [View]



Re: [videoblogging] Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Pete Prodoehl | Pete Prodoehl <raster@...> | raster
August 11, 2005 | Post #19661 | Topic #19610

Frank Carver wrote: > Thursday, August 11, 2005, 7:55:12 PM, Pete Prodoehl wrote: > >>Permit for what? Do you need a permit to shoot video on the subway or >>other locations? (I'm asking because I really don't know. Are the >>videographers rights the same as the well known photographers rights?) > > > What you need to remember is that traditionally TV and moviemaking has > meant big budgets. Many big cities in the USA (where lots of such things > are shot), long ago decided to cash in on these lucrative activities. > > In such places (which (AFAIK) include LA, NY, and Chicago, for example) > you need to pay up front for a permit to shoot, and will be nabbed if > spotted doing something that looks like pro filmmaking without a > permit. > > In these cases, looking like a dumb tourist is actually an advantage > :) Hmmm, "what I need to remember" sounds just all wrong... I was never involved in traditional tv or moviemaking, so I would have no idea I'd need a permit to walk around a major city with a video camera. See? It always comes back around to money. The cities wanted to make money off of big media, and we have to suffer because of it. Sigh... Pete -- http://tinkernet.org/ videoblog for the future... [View]



Re: [videoblogging] Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Pete Prodoehl | Pete Prodoehl <raster@...> | raster
August 11, 2005 | Post #19660 | Topic #19610

Steve Watkins wrote: > And there is the War On Terror aspect. In the past this list has seen > a few discussions about Subway station 'you arent allowed to film > here' legislation and the reality on the ground. I guess that one was > New York specific, cant remember details. But the basics are that if > you are videoing places that could be of interest as terrorist > targets, well you could be a terrorist doing reconnacence on the > target. And I believe they can even abstract that idea further, eg > 'you are not a terrorist but if you make your footage publically > available, a terrorist could use it to plan naughty deeds'. Time to print up some 'Just Another Videoblogger' t-shirts.. :\ Pete -- http://tinkernet.org/ videoblog for the future... [View]



Re: [videoblogging] Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Devlon | Devlon <duthied@...> | duthied2004
August 11, 2005 | Post #19662 | Topic #19610

On 8/11/05, Pete Prodoehl <raster@...> wrote: > Time to print up som= e 'Just Another Videoblogger' t-shirts.. :\ Oooh, ooh, I'll take 2 of thos= e please :) -- ~Devlon http://8bitme.blogspot.com http://whiteguyforeign= foods.blogspot.com http://devlon.blogspot.com [View]



Re: [videoblogging] Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Pete Prodoehl | Pete Prodoehl <raster@...> | raster
August 11, 2005 | Post #19664 | Topic #19610

Devlon wrote: > On 8/11/05, Pete Prodoehl <raster@...> wrote: > >> Time to print up some 'Just Another Videoblogger' t-shirts.. :\ > > Oooh, ooh, I'll take 2 of those please :) Woo Hoo! Look at me! I found a way to make money with videoblogging! ;) Pete -- http://tinkernet.org/ videoblog for the future... [View]



Re: [videoblogging] Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Devlon | Devlon <duthied@...> | duthied2004
August 11, 2005 | Post #19666 | Topic #19610

:) You are assuming I was going to pay for them Pete. ~Devlon On 8/11/05,= Pete Prodoehl <raster@...> wrote: > Devlon wrote: > > On 8/11/05, = Pete Prodoehl <raster@...> wrote: > > > >> Time to print up some '= Just Another Videoblogger' t-shirts.. :\ > > > > > Oooh, ooh, I'll tak= e 2 of those please :) > > Woo Hoo! Look at me! I found a way to make mo= ney with videoblogging! ;) > > Pete > > -- > http://tinkernet.org/ = > videoblog for the future... > > [View]



Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Jack Nelson | "Jack Nelson" <jack@...> | mexiculture
August 11, 2005 | Post #19670 | Topic #19610

--- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Pete Prodoehl <raster@g...> wrote: > Jack Nelson wrote: > > --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, "chrbaudry" <chrbaudry@g...> wrote: > >>Yesterday I brought my Canon Elura video camera which is a small > >>hand camera just fine to shoot video that will be streamed > >> > >>Guess what? No one cared about me! Teachers had other priorities, I > >>was basically ignored and wasted one hour! > > > > > Yeah, having a big pro-like camera can work against you in certain situations too. It's > > pretty easy to get footage on the subway for instance if you have a small non-pro looking > > camera. But whip out that big shoulder DVC60 and you'll be asked pretty soon where your > > permit is. > > Permit for what? Do you need a permit to shoot video on the subway or > other locations? (I'm asking because I really don't know. Are the > videographers rights the same as the well known photographers rights?) Most major cities require permits to film in public. I just did a promotional film for a publishing company in NYC, something that will end up on DVD and passed out to prospective clients. We needed about ten seconds of Mr. Everyman coming to work on the subway. We did it in Queens without any problems but later I told a professional cameraman working in NYC that we had done it and... [View]



Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Jack Nelson | "Jack Nelson" <jack@...> | mexiculture
August 11, 2005 | Post #19671 | Topic #19610

--- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Pete Prodoehl <raster@g...> wrote: > Frank Carver wrote: > > Thursday, August 11, 2005, 7:55:12 PM, Pete Prodoehl wrote: > > > >>Permit for what? Do you need a permit to shoot video on the subway or > >>other locations? (I'm asking because I really don't know. Are the > >>videographers rights the same as the well known photographers rights?) > > > > > > What you need to remember is that traditionally TV and moviemaking has > > meant big budgets. Many big cities in the USA (where lots of such things > > are shot), long ago decided to cash in on these lucrative activities. > > > > In such places (which (AFAIK) include LA, NY, and Chicago, for example) > > you need to pay up front for a permit to shoot, and will be nabbed if > > spotted doing something that looks like pro filmmaking without a > > permit. > > > > In these cases, looking like a dumb tourist is actually an advantage > > :) > > Hmmm, "what I need to remember" sounds just all wrong... I was never > involved in traditional tv or moviemaking, so I would have no idea I'd > need a permit to walk around a major city with a video camera. > > See? It always comes back around to money. The cities wanted to make > money off... [View]



Re: [videoblogging] Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By robert a/k/a r | robert a/k/a r <robert.videoblogging@...> | hyperdistribution
August 11, 2005 | Post #19672 | Topic #19610

The Mayor's Film Office here is pretty easy (ymmv so I've heard but not our experience) to work with, you fill in the forms (download, filling in takes 5 minutes), send someone up there with forms and they review them (can take from an hour to three), they may ask a few questions (of the person delivering the forms or they telephone you) as the forms seem never quite clear enough, and they issue a permit for specific locations for a specific term. No fees, but you must have the proper insurance in place since you are making a rep when you fill in the forms. Further, if you want to film in a park, after you receive your permit you must contact the the parks department person responsible for that park (it appears each has a few parks, is regional). It's not a big deal, get the permit. And people here are very friendly here and we've found it easy to chat with folks on camera. One more thought, when filming peeps the usual release concerns apply, and regarding audio you might want to avoid issues if a nearby boombox is pumping out copyrighted tunes. -r -- <URL:http://r.24x7.com&gt; <URL:http://itunes.24x7.com&gt; On Aug 11, 2005, at 6:29 PM, Jack Nelson wrote: > --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Pete Prodoehl <raster@g...> > wrote: >> Frank Carver wrote: >>> Thursday, August 11, 2005, 7:55:12 PM, Pete Prodoehl wrote: >>> >>>> Permit for what? Do you... [View]



Re: [videoblogging] Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Jan McLaughlin | Jan McLaughlin <vze4pnhk@...> | janmclaughlin08
August 11, 2005 | Post #19673 | Topic #19610

Insurance is very expensive, btw. Haven't check it out in a long while; t= he only thing I can be sure of, it hasn't gone down lately. How much is it= these days and what minimum time / amount? Does the mayor's office still= require $1M? J -- "It isn't done alone" http://fauxpress.blogspot.com = http://blog.urbanartadventures.com . On Aug 11, 2005, at 6:45 PM, robert a/= k/a r wrote: > The Mayor's Film Office here is pretty easy (ymmv so I've h= eard but not > our experience) to work with, you fill in the forms (downloa= d, filling > in takes 5 minutes), send someone up there with forms and they= review > them (can take from an hour to three), they may ask a few questio= ns (of > the person delivering the forms or they telephone you) as the form= s > seem never quite clear enough, and they issue a permit for specific > l= ocations for a specific term. No fees, but you must have the proper > insur= ance in place since you are making a rep when you fill in the > forms. Furt= her, if you want to film in a park, after you receive your > permit you mus= t contact the the parks department person responsible for > that park (it a= ppears each has a few parks, is regional). It's not a > big deal, get the p= ermit. And... [View]



Re: [videoblogging] Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Chris Baudry | Chris Baudry <chrbaudry@...> | chrbaudry
August 11, 2005 | Post #19675 | Topic #19610

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Re: [videoblogging] Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Chris Baudry | Chris Baudry <chrbaudry@...> | chrbaudry
August 11, 2005 | Post #19676 | Topic #19610

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Re: [videoblogging] Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Andreas Haugstrup | "Andreas Haugstrup" <solitude@...> | andreashaugstrup
August 11, 2005 | Post #19677 | Topic #19610

On Fri, 12 Aug 2005 02:31:50 +0200, Chris Baudry <chrbaudry@...> wrote: > Even in a private environment you need to have people sign a form > agreeing > to be filmed. In the case of the yoga classes we had all participants > sign > the document before the class... except one student who arrived late and > at > the end said she was upset by the filming and did not agree to be part of > the film.... Since she was in the middle of the group... one hour of > shooting lost :-( In private enviroments it's always a good idea to get permission to film. In public areas... not so much. It all depends on what you are going to use the footage for. Is it for commercial use? Get permission always. Is it nonprofit use and you're filming in public? Not such a big deal. In that case you won't run into misappropriation unless you're making Weird Shit(tm) and privacy laws don't prohibit filming when the subject doesn't have reasonable grounds to expect privacy (like walking down a street). - Andreas -- <URL:http://www.solitude.dk/&gt; Commentary on media, communication, culture and technology. [View]