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Post #645

Re: [videoblogging] Digest Number 60

By Deirdre' Straughan | Deirdre' Straughan <lists@...> | deirdrebs2002
August 10, 2004 | Post #645 | Topic #644

--=======81A760D======= Content-Type: multipart/alternative; x-avg-checked=avg-ok-40E16505; boundary="=====================_88388625==.ALT" --=====================_88388625==.ALT Content-Type: text/plain; x-avg-checked=avg-ok-40E16505; charset=iso-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable At 02:14 PM 8/10/2004, you wrote: >Truly accessible for who? If you mean f= or hearies and for deafies, >why? The vblogs would be targeted at deafies,= not hearies. If you >were an hearie who knew BSL, then no problem, but wh= y should >provision be made for hearies who don't know BSL? After all, the= y >don't always make provision for deafies, and that is something we've >ha= d to fight for years. Sorry, I hadn't understood that your focus was on de= af-to-deaf; I thought it was about making more of what's available in vide= o [originally targeted at hearies] accessible to the deaf. (NB: Not thinki= ng too clearly this week - we've just had a death in the family. No, there= will be no video blog about that...) >I don't agree that subtitling wil= l be easier; for a lot of deafies >whose first language is BSL, they can't = understand written English, >which is basically what subtitles are. I unde= rstood that as I read a subsequent post, thanks - I'm learning! >I'm glad= you brought up the issue of subtitles by the way, >Deirdr=E9. We all know = that many TV channels and most films are now >subtitled (either at the cine= ma, on VHS or DVD), but what about >video streams on the internet? Broadca= sting is regulated by various >organistions, but as far as I know, the inte= rnet isn't regulated at >all, so how can you ensure that deafies are given = complete access to >this medium? Probably no one can, just as no one can e= nsure that all (text) websites are accessible to the blind, although there= are standards in place to do that, and it's much easier technically to ma= ke a text site work with text-to-speech equipment for the blind, than it i= s to add sign language. Subtitling isn't easy, at least not now, but, as i= n the point I was trying to make before, it's a lot easier for the average= video producer to add subtitles than to find someone who can do sign lang= uage interpretation for us and add that to our video streams. best reg= ards, Deirdr=E9 Straughan http://www.straughan.com --=====================_88388625==.ALT Content-Type: text/html; x-avg-checked=avg-ok-40E16505; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable <html> <body> <font size=3D3>At 02:14 PM 8/10/2004, you wrote:<br> <blockqu= ote type=3Dcite class=3Dcite cite=3D"">Truly accessible for who?  If y= ou mean for hearies and for deafies, <br> why?  The vblogs would be ta= rgeted at deafies, not hearies.  If you <br> were an hearie who knew B= SL, then no problem, but why should <br> provision be made for hearies who = don't know BSL?  After all, they <br> don't always make provision for = deafies, and that is something we've <br> had to fight for years.</font></b= lockquote><br> Sorry, I hadn't understood that your focus was on deaf-to-de= af; I thought it was about making more of what's available in video [origin= ally targeted at hearies] accessible to the deaf. (NB: Not thinking too cle= arly this week - we've just had a death in the family. No, there will be no= video blog about that...)<br><br> <br> <blockquote type=3Dcite class=3Dcit= e cite=3D""><font size=3D3>I don't agree that subtitling will be easier; fo= r a lot of deafies <br> whose first language is BSL, they can't understand = written English, <br> which is basically what subtitles are.</font></block= quote><br> I understood that as I read a subsequent post, thanks - I'm lear= ning!<br><br> <br> <blockquote type=3Dcite class=3Dcite cite=3D""><font siz= e=3D3>I'm glad you brought up the issue of subtitles by the way,<br> Deirdr= =E9. We all know that many TV channels and most films are now <br> subtitle= d (either at the cinema, on VHS or DVD), but what about <br> video streams = on the internet?  Broadcasting is regulated by various <br> organistio= ns, but as far as I know, the internet isn't regulated at <br> all, so how= can you ensure that deafies are given complete access to <br> this medium?= </font></blockquote><br> Probably no one can, just as no one can ensure th= at all (text) websites are accessible to the blind, although there are stan= dards in place to do that, and it's much easier technically to make a text = site work with text-to-speech equipment for the blind, than it is to add si= gn language. Subtitling isn't easy, at least not now, but, as in the point = I was trying to make before, it's a lot easier for the average video produc= er to add subtitles than to find someone who can do sign language interpret= ation for us and add that to our video streams.<br><br> <br><br> <x-sigsep>= <p></x-sigsep> <font size=3D3>best regards,<br> Deirdr=E9 Straughan<br><br>= <a href=3D"http://www.straughan.com/&quot; eudora=3D"autourl">http://www.straug= han.com<br> </a></font></body> </html> --=====================_88388625==.ALT-- --=======81A760D=======--