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Post #19670

Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Jack Nelson | "Jack Nelson" <jack@...> | mexiculture
August 11, 2005 | Post #19670 | Topic #19610

--- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Pete Prodoehl <raster@g...> wrote: > Jack Nelson wrote: > > --- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, "chrbaudry" <chrbaudry@g...> wrote: > >>Yesterday I brought my Canon Elura video camera which is a small > >>hand camera just fine to shoot video that will be streamed > >> > >>Guess what? No one cared about me! Teachers had other priorities, I > >>was basically ignored and wasted one hour! > > > > > Yeah, having a big pro-like camera can work against you in certain situations too. It's > > pretty easy to get footage on the subway for instance if you have a small non-pro looking > > camera. But whip out that big shoulder DVC60 and you'll be asked pretty soon where your > > permit is. > > Permit for what? Do you need a permit to shoot video on the subway or > other locations? (I'm asking because I really don't know. Are the > videographers rights the same as the well known photographers rights?) Most major cities require permits to film in public. I just did a promotional film for a publishing company in NYC, something that will end up on DVD and passed out to prospective clients. We needed about ten seconds of Mr. Everyman coming to work on the subway. We did it in Queens without any problems but later I told a professional cameraman working in NYC that we had done it and he said we were lucky. They've always required permits for filming, even if it's a student film and not professional. After 911 they are looking even more closely at this sort of thing. > > Pete > > -- > http://tinkernet.org/ > videoblog for the future...