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Re: When the video camera makes the reputation…

By Jack Nelson | "Jack Nelson" <jack@...> | mexiculture
August 11, 2005 | Post #19671 | Topic #19610

--- In videoblogging@yahoogroups.com, Pete Prodoehl <raster@g...> wrote: > Frank Carver wrote: > > Thursday, August 11, 2005, 7:55:12 PM, Pete Prodoehl wrote: > > > >>Permit for what? Do you need a permit to shoot video on the subway or > >>other locations? (I'm asking because I really don't know. Are the > >>videographers rights the same as the well known photographers rights?) > > > > > > What you need to remember is that traditionally TV and moviemaking has > > meant big budgets. Many big cities in the USA (where lots of such things > > are shot), long ago decided to cash in on these lucrative activities. > > > > In such places (which (AFAIK) include LA, NY, and Chicago, for example) > > you need to pay up front for a permit to shoot, and will be nabbed if > > spotted doing something that looks like pro filmmaking without a > > permit. > > > > In these cases, looking like a dumb tourist is actually an advantage > > :) > > Hmmm, "what I need to remember" sounds just all wrong... I was never > involved in traditional tv or moviemaking, so I would have no idea I'd > need a permit to walk around a major city with a video camera. > > See? It always comes back around to money. The cities wanted to make > money off of big media, and we have to suffer because of it. Sigh... It's not money really. I was told that the NYC permits were free. I think they said you get one cop for free with the permit. They are concerned mostly with a big mass of cameras, lights, equipment etc. blocking sidewalks and access. That's why the permits started. We also filmed several segments on the sidewalks of NYC where you are also supposed to have permits. We had a camera and tripod (the tripod is potentialy bad, blocking sidewalks again). We spent the time to tell the locals what we were doing and even got some volunteer actors. I also was very concious of where I setup and I was quick to take the tripod down after each shot. We had no trouble. We even had a guy who became our unofficial guide. We wanted people of various ethnic backgrounds to say "Hi" to the everyman guy. This one shopkeeper took us around the neighborhood intorducing us to all the other shopkeepers. "You want Brazilians? I can talk to the girls in the hairdressing shop. You want Italian? There's a great place around the corner" and so on. I just wish we could have gotten that on film. We got turned down only once. There was one woman who was very pretty but did not want to be filmed. Eventually she told us she was in the US without papers, so we just moved on. > > Pete > > -- > http://tinkernet.org/ > videoblog for the future...